Counted Worthy Of Suffering Disgrace For The Name

For some of the believers who went on to lose their lives during the Chinese Boxer rebellion of 1900, it was a privilege to share in the sufferings of their Savior and with much joy, others anticipated their welcome when they arrive Heaven's door.

Following excerpt from 28% into By Love Compelled, The Call of The China Inland Mission by Marshall Broomhall
...The masterful Empress-Dowager seized the reins of government, imprisoned the youthful Emperor, and then sent forth a series of inflammatory edicts. “The various Powers,” she wrote, “cast upon us looks of tiger-like ferocity, hustling each other in their endeavours to be the first to seize upon our innermost territory.”

With such a determined and passionate woman in command, with famine as an evidence of Heaven’s displeasure, the fiercest resentment of the multitude was soon fanned into a flame. The Patriotic Volunteers, more commonly known as Boxers, speedily sprang into prominence, with dire results...In all 135 missionaries, with 53 children, were put to death, and of this number 79 were connected with the China Inland Mission, 58 being adults and 21 children. Of the total of 188, just over 100 were British, 56 were Swedish and 32 were Americans.

By far the greater number of those who were killed were resident in the northern province of Shansi. Here the persecutions broke with unexampled fury, for the Manchu Governor was something of a modern Herod. He was present at the massacre of about fifty foreigners, and possibly participated in the slaughter. Some of the missionaries who escaped travelled a thousand miles on foot through burning heat and through hostile territory. That any lived to tell the tale was little short of a miracle. Several children had to be buried by the wayside, and those who struggled through to safety did so in a starving and almost naked condition.

The literature of those days must be read to appreciate the terrible nature of those experiences, and to breathe something of the Christlike spirit of the martyrs and the sufferers. “I am filled with comfort, I am exceedingly joyful in all our tribulations,” wrote one who was actually slain by the Boxers. “We rejoice that we are made partakers of the sufferings of Christ,” wrote another shortly before his death. Letters recovered after that terrible ordeal reveal the spirit of those who died for Christ and China. “I cannot imagine the Saviour’s welcome,” wrote one. “Oh, that will compensate for all these days of suspense,” she continued. “Dear ones, live near to God, and cling less closely to earth.” Love did not fail, nor was it drowned by the waters of tribulation.

By Love Compelled, The Call of The China Inland Mission

Genre:Organization
Subject:China Inland Mission
Publisher:Hodder and Stoughton
Year:1936
Location:London
Library:Missiology.org.uk
Online:https://missiology.org.uk/blog/call-of-t...

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For some of the believers who went on to lose their lives during the Chinese Boxer rebellion of 1900, it was a privilege to share in the sufferings of their Savior and with much joy, others anticipated their welcome when they arrive Heaven's door.