Counted Worthy Of Suffering Disgrace For The Name

Bishop Ignatius was cast into prison for failing to renounce his faith in Christ, and instead of bowing to the demands of his captors, he wrote them a powerful letter; stating his total commitment to Christ and joy at being counted worthy to suffer for Christ sake.

Following excerpt from 14% into Christianity Demonstrated by Experience, Presenting the Testimony of its Converts by James Porter
Ignatius was elected bishop of Antioch, A. D. 70, and forty years afterward was cast into prison and sentenced to be devoured by wild beasts, unless he would renounce the Christian faith.

But this he would not do, and received his sentence with joy. "I thank thee, o Lord,” he exclaimed, “that thou hast condescended to honor me with thy love, and hast thought me worthy, with thy apostle Paul, to be bound in iron chains.”

In a letter to Rome, under these trying circumstances, he wrote:

“Now I begin to be a disciple; nor shall anything move me, whether visible or invisible, that I may attain to Christ Jesus. Let fire and the cross ; let the companies of wild beasts; let breaking of bones and tearing of members; let the shattering in pieces of the whole body, and all the wicked torments of the devil come upon me; only let me enjoy Jesus Christ. All the ends of the world and the kingdoms of it, will profit me nothing; I would rather die for Jesus Christ than rule the utmost ends of the earth. Him I seek who died for us; him I desire that rose again for us. This is the gain that is laid up for me.”

Christianity Demonstrated by Experience, Presenting the Testimony of its Converts

Genre:Testimonies
Subject:Testimonies
Publisher:Phillips & Hunt
Year:1882
Location:New York
Library:Open Library
Online:https://archive.org/details/christianity...

Scripture Testimony Index stories in this book

Bishop Ignatius was cast into prison for failing to renounce his faith in Christ, and instead of bowing to the demands of his captors, he wrote them a powerful letter; stating his total commitment to Christ and joy at being counted worthy to suffer for Christ sake.
Thomas Walsh was a deeply religious man who was raised by devout Romanist parents. But Thomas's devout religious indulgence still didn't lead his heart to finding rest, he grew increasingly miserable instead, until he heard the words: "Come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden.”